3 Mar

Acheter une propriété avec 5 % de mise de fonds

General

Posted by: Drummond Team

Acheter une propriété avec 5 % de mise de fonds

L’abc de l’effet de levier, ou comment une mise de fonds minimale vous permettra d’augmenter considérablement la valeur de votre actif.

29 Fév. 2016 par Romana King

Photo: iStock.

L’investissement dans le secteur de l’immobilier est populaire parce qu’il permet, avec une mise de fonds relativement minime, de posséder un actif qui vaut beaucoup plus. C’est ce qu’on appelle l’effet de levier. Utilisé avec prudence, celui-ci peut vous aider à augmenter votre valeur nette.

Pour les premiers acheteurs, l’effet de levier se traduit par la possibilité d’acquérir une propriété avec une mise de fonds initiale d’à peine 5 %. Par exemple, vous pourriez acheter un condo ou une maison de 450 000 dollars avec seulement 22 500 dollars de comptant (plus les coûts liés à la transaction).

Toutefois, avant de considérer l’achat d’une propriété avec une mise de fonds de 5 %, vous devez satisfaire à certaines conditions imposées par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement:

  • La maison devra constituer votre résidence principale. Autrement dit, vous devrez y vivre. Il n’est pas possible d’acheter ainsi une propriété si c’est pour en faire la location.
  • La mise de fonds doit provenir de vos économies personnelles ou d’un cadeau offert par un membre de votre famille. Il n’est donc pas possible de la financer à l’aide d’une marge de crédit ou d’un prêt de la banque.
  • Vous devrez prouver au prêteur que vous serez en mesure de payer les frais de clôture de la transaction immobilière. En général, prévoyez de 1 % à 1,5 % du prix d’achat pour couvrir ces frais. Pour une propriété de 450 000 dollars, mettez de côté au moins 4 500 dollars, que vous consacrerez aux frais de notaire, aux frais de transfert de propriété, etc.
  • Vous devez avoir un bon dossier de crédit, et occuper le même emploi depuis au moins un an.
  • La somme de ce que vous versez en paiements hypothécaires, en chauffage et électricité, en frais de copropriété (le cas échéant) et en impôts fonciers ne doit pas excéder 32 % de votre revenu brut.

 

Romana King est écrivaine, blogueuse et chef de section pour le magazine MoneySense, en plus d’être courtière immobilière à Toronto.

L’actualité Express

Source: http://www.lactualite.com/lactualite-affaires/acheter-une-propriete-avec-5-de-mise-de-fonds/

3 Mar

Diverging Housing Markets And BC Budget

General

Posted by: Drummond Team

Diverging Housing Markets And BC Budget

Diverging Housing Markets And BC BudgetData released earlier this week for January showed the stunning disparity in regional housing markets in Canada (see chart below). Vancouver remains the red-hot leader with year-over-year (y/y) price gains of 20.6% and home resales growth of an eye-popping 32.1%. In comparison, Toronto’s housing market seems almost tepid, with an annual price gain of 10.7% and resales growth of a mere 7.3%.

In direct contrast, regions of the country that have been hard hit by oil price declines continue to experience a marked slowdown in housing activity. For example, house prices in Calgary fell 3.1% y/y in January and existing home sales fell 13.8%. In recent months, the decline has been even bigger. Sales in Calgary are down more than 40% from their 2014 high. In this context, the price declines have been relatively modest. Additional price cuts are likely through 2016. Those who purchased homes before mid-2013, however, still have significant but dwindling equity gains.

The BC budget, released this week, shone the spotlight on the lack of affordable housing in the Vancouver region. Vancouver has an almost unheard of 91% sales-to-new listings ratio implying that almost every new listing is sold within the month. Concern about housing affordability prompted the BC government to introduce measures to address escalating housing market imbalances.

British Columbia has the strongest economy in the country, with growth expected to be roughly 2.4% this year. BC also has the strongest fiscal position, with a triple-A debt rating and surpluses expected to continue. The BC economy, though hit by falling commodity prices, is sufficiently diversified to have weathered the storm quite well–boosted by strength in manufacturing, retailing, technology, trade and film.

Population growth and a tourism boom is also contributing to the prosperity. More than 48,200 newcomers are expected to move to BC this year, including 13,000 from other provinces and 35,200 from other countries. Alberta’s woes have caused thousands of workers to move westward. In the third quarter of 2015, BC posted the highest quarterly level of net interprovincial migration since 1995. The weak Canadian dollar has boosted tourism and the film industry in Hollywood North.

Housing Measures in the BC Budget

In the first overhaul of the Property Transfer Tax since its inception in 1988, Finance Minister Mike de Jong raised the exemption threshold solely on new homes to $750,000 if they are owner occupied as a principal residence for at least one year. This new tax break is available only to Canadian citizens or permanent residents and could mean a savings of up to $13,000. This could bump up the price of new homes unless it triggers an increase in supply, as the government hopes.

To offset the anticipated $75 million cost of this initiative, the government is increasing the Property Transfer Tax rate on the portion of the home value that is in excess of $2 million to 3% (the current 1% on the first $200,000 and 2% on the value between $200,000 and $2 million will be maintained).

Budget 2016 confirmed an earlier announcement that the province is committing $355 million over a five-year period to construct or renovate affordable housing units throughout the province.

The government also proposes new measures to improve data collection around real estate transactions, specifically to monitor foreign investment. Homebuyers will have to identify as Canadian citizens or permanent residents when they register their property and individuals who are neither will be required to disclose their country of citizenship; corporations will be required to disclose their directors’ citizenship; homebuyers will have to disclose whether they are buying the property as a trustee.

Greater transparency into the currently opaque foreign investment component of housing activity is overdue and should help to provide a factual basis for future discussion. Hopefully, the province will continue to welcome foreign investors as the Minister suggests.

The effect of these measures will be modest at first. It will take time to assess their impact, but the majority of purchasers are buying existing homes, not new homes, so the relief will not be widespread.

Diverging Housing Markets And BC Budget

 

Dr. Sherry Cooper

Chief Economist, Dominion Lending Centres
Sherry is an award-winning authority on finance and economics with over 30 years of bringing economic insights and clarity to Canadians.

3 Mar

Canadian Growth in 2015 a Mere 1.2%

General

Posted by: Drummond Team

Q4 Growth At 0.8% Boosts 2015 to Only 1.2%

Bank of Canada Does Not Cut Rates
 
Today’s stronger than expected fourth quarter GDP figure of 0.8% annualized growth did little to assuage concerns that the Canadian economy is growing well below potential. Many expected growth to be flat in the final quarter of last year. The growth figure released today by Statistics Canada was boosted by the biggest drop in imports in six years—the direct result of surging import prices owing to the weak loonie and the fact that Canadians are traveling less outside the country. This is hardly something to cheer about, although it does take pressure off the Bank of Canada to cut interest rates further.

Final domestic demand – GDP less net exports and inventories – actually declined in the period between October and December, reflecting big reductions in business investment, particularly in non-residential construction. Business investment declined at a 6.8% annual rate, its fourth consecutive decline. Spending for non-residential construction and machinery and equipment – key contributors to productivity growth – plunged at a whopping 13.2% annual rate, largely in the energy and mining sectors. Consumer spending growth slowed as well relative to the prior quarter.
Housing was the one bright spot in the economy, although new housing construction slowed. The growth was attributable to the continued strength in the resale market (mainly in Vancouver and Toronto), as well as housing renovations.

Export growth was very disappointing. It had been an important contributor to the growth earlier in the year. Exports of goods decreased at a 2.0% annual rate, mostly because of the decline in sales of aircraft and other transportation equipment and parts (think Bombardier).

For the year as a whole, 2015 was pretty dismal. The economy advanced only 1.2% – not nearly enough to assure adequate job creation. This was half the pace posted in 2014. Canada’s terms of trade – the price of exports relative to the price of imports – declined sharply, reflecting the sharp drop in oil prices and the surging price of imports.

Given the latest round of spending cuts and layoffs in the oil patch, first quarter growth this year is likely to be quite tepid. The recovery in manufacturing is disappointingly slow and consumer spending is dampened by rising unemployment and record-high debt levels.

Fiscal stimulus is no doubt coming to mitigate the damage of the commodity price plunge. The March 22 budget will likely increase the federal deficit to at least $30 billion, triple the Liberal Party pledge during the election campaign. The Bank of Canada meets again next Wednesday, but is unlikely to cut rates further, leaving the feds to take the lead. The Bank held off in January as well, concerned that the rise in import prices would boost inflation and hoping fiscal stimulus would come to the rescue. All eyes will be on Ottawa later this month as continued depressed growth weakens consumer and business confidence.

Q4 Growth At 0.8% Boosts 2015 to Only 1.2%

Dr. Sherry Cooper
Chief Economist, Dominion Lending Centres